Involuntarily digital footprints violate personal integrity (learn about GDPR)

The aim of this blog post is to make “average Joe” understand how the new upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) affects his everyday life.

To start with, let’s sort some expressions out.

Digital footprint

According to Wikipedia, there are two main classifications for digital footprints;
• Passive digital footprint – Data collected without the owner’s knowledge.
• Active digital footprint – Data released deliberately by the user himself (i.e. sharing an image on Facebook).

Personal integrity

Integrity could be described as the quality of being honest and having strong moral principles. In general, it’s a personal choice how to choose your standpoint in the question of integrity. Gossiping about secrets told in confidence is an example to illustrate with. Publishing images of others without their knowledge is another (this might even be illegal).

This illustrative case could be you

To understand what GDPR is about and how it affects your everyday life I will illustrate by an example that I hope you could recognize yourself in.

Imagine: You live in an apartment in a mid-size facility with other people (we can choose to call them neighbours). In front of the facilities there is a space dedicated for parking cars. One day a neighbour of yours chooses to move and therefore hires a real-estate agent, helping out with selling the apartment.

As you are somewhat curious about what the apartments in your neighbourhood is worth, you look the advertisement for the apartment up on the internet. When you find the apartment you see your own car on the picture in the parking space. On top of this you discover that the registration number of the car is fully visible.

Should you care?

According to Datainspektionen, registration numbers is considered as “personal data”. So the first mistake by the broker being done here is creating a passive digital footprint for you. The second mistake by the broker being done is breaking the law. In Sweden it is not allowed to publish personal data without acknowledgement by the owner.

The moral compass of the broker should be questioned here. A passive digital footprint in your name is created, your personal integrity has been violated and the law has been broken.

On top of that: GDPR starts in may 2018. You have the right to be forgotten whenever you want (you can push companies to remove your personal data from their systems).

Is there a business case?

A lawyer could probably build a business case around suing real-estate brokers for publishing pictures of cars registration numbers without the owner’s acknowledgement.

As a regular citizen you should probably not get to agitated about a picture of your cars registration number? Or maybe you should, it depends on your level of personal integrity. As the modern society evolves, the amount of different types of information being digitalized grows by the day.

By this example, I hope “average Joe” now understands what digital footprints, personal integrity and GDPR is. Maybe this got you thinking and you want to know more about GDPR.

There are probably two ways to see on this in a sober way. Live with your personal data being spread (and get used to that you soon won’t have anything personal anymore) or maybe it’s time to stick the neck out and say “hey, stop publishing my personal data without asking me”.

No matter if you want it or not, you are affected by GDPR.

 

 

Written by: Markus Edström