Elastic{ON} 2017 – breaking all the records!

Elastic{ON} 2017 draws 2200 participants to Pier 48 during these somewhat chilly San Francisco days in March. It’s a 40% increase from the 1600 or so participants last year, in line with the growing interest for the Elastic Stack and the successes of Elastic commercially.

From Findwise – we are a team of 4 Findwizards, networking, learning and reporting.

Shay Banon, the creator of Elasticsearch and Elastic CTO, is doing both the opening and closing keynote. It is apparent that the transition of the CEO role from Steven Schuurman has already started.

ElasticON 2017

2016 in retrospective with the future in mind

Elastic reached 100 million downloads in 2016, and have managed to land approximately 4000 paying subscription customers out of this installed base to date. A lot of presentations during the conference is centered around new functionality that is developed and will be released to the open source community freely. Other functionality goes into the commercial X-pack subscriptions. Some X-pack functionality is available freely under the Basic subscription level that only requires registration.

Most presentations are centered around search powered analytics, and fewer around regular free text search. Elasticsearch and the Elastic Stack got its main use cases within logging, analytics and in various applications as a data platform or middle-layer with search use-cases as a strong sidekick.

A strong focus on analytics

There’s 22 sponsors at the event, and most of the companies are either offering cloud based monitoring or machine learning services. IBM, the platinum sponsor, are promoting the Bluemix cloud services for cognitive Watson functionality and uses the conference to reach out to the predominantly developer-focused audience.

Prelert was acquired in September last year, and is now being integrated into the Elastic Stack as the Machine Learning component and is used for unsupervised anomaly detection to give operation log insights. Together with the new modular Beats architecture and various Kibana improvements, it looks apparent that Elastic is chasing the huge market Splunk currently controls within logging and analytics.

Elasticsearch SQL – giving BI what it needs

Elasticsearch SQL will give the search engine SQL capability just like Solr got with their parallel SQL interface. Elasticsearch is becoming more and more a “data platform”. Increasingly becomming an competitor to HPE Vertica and Amazon RedShift as it hits a sweet spot use-case where a combination of faster data loading and extreme scalability is needed, and it is acceptable with the tradeoffs of limited functionality (such as the lack of JOIN operations). With SQL support the platform can use existing visualization tools such as Tableu and it expands the user base as many people in the Business Intelligence sector knows SQL by heart.

Fast and simple Beats is music to our ears

Beats will become modular in the next release, and more beats modules will be created either by Elastic or in the open source or commercial community. This increases simple connectivity to various data sources, and adds standardized dashboards for the data source, which will increase simplicity and speed in implementation.

Heartbeat is a new Beat (with a beautiful name!) that send pings to check that services are alive and functioning.

Kibana goes international

Kibana is maturing with some new key updates coming soon. A Time series visual builder that will give graphical guidance on how to build the dashboards, Kibana Canvas gives custom dynamic reports and enables slide show presentations with live data, and the GUI frontend is translated to various languages.

There’s a new tile service for maps, so instead of relying on external map services, Elastic now got control over the maps functionality. The service can be used free of charge but requires registration (Basic subscription) to use all 18 zoom levels.

kibana-int

 

To conclude, we’ve had three good days with exciting product news and lots of interesting meetings in what could very well be the biggest show for search and search-driven analytics right now! Be sure to see us at the next year’s Elastic{ON} again. If not before, see you then!

 

From San Francisco with love,

/Andreas, Christian, Joar and Peter

Elastic Stack 5.0 is released

At a first glance, the major Elasticsearch version bump might seem frightening. Going from version 2.4.x to 5.0 is a big jump, but there’s no need to worry. The main reason is to align versions between the different products in the stack. Having all products on the same version will make it a lot easier to handle future upgrades and simplify the overall experience for both new and existing users.

All products in the stack have been updated, some more than others. Here are a few highlights regarding Elasticsearch 5.0 that we recommend you to read before upgrading. Or schedule an appointment with us and we’ll help you out!

New relevance model

Elasticsearch prior version 5 used the default scoring algorithm TF/IDF. From now on the default algorithm is BM25.

Depending on the nature of your indexed information, a re-index operation might give you slightly different results and most likely more relevant.

Re-index from remote

This new feature of the Elasticsearch API is really useful when for example upgrading from old clusters. By specifying a remote cluster in the API call, you can easily transfer old documents to your newly created 5.0 cluster without going through a rolling node upgrade procedure.

Ingest Node

There’s a new node type in town. Starting from version 5.0, Elasticsearch gives you the possibility to do simple data manipulation within a running cluster prior indexing. This is useful if you prefer a more simplistic architecture without Logstash instances, but still require to do some alterations to your data.

Most core processors found in Logstash are available. Often used ones include:

  • Date Processor
  • Convert processor
  • Grok Processor
  • Rename Processor
  • JSON Processor

Search and Aggregations

The search API has been refactored to be more clever regarding which indices are hit, but also if aggregations need to be recalculated or not when issuing range queries. By looking at when indices were last modified, range aggregations can be cached and only recalculated if really needed. This improvement is really useful for the typical log analytic case with time series data. You will notice speed improvements in your Kibana dashboards.

New data structures

Lucence 6.0 introduces a new feature called dimensional points, which uses the k-d tree geo-spatial data structure to enable fast single- and multi-dimensional numeric range and geo-spatial point-in-shape filtering. Elasticsearch 5.0 implements a variant called block k-d tree specifically designed for efficient IO, which gives significant performance boosts when indexing as well as filtering.

Should I upgrade?

If your typical use case involves geo-spatial queries and filtering, we definitely recommend that you upgrade your cluster and re-index your documents to gain the performance boost. Due to the simplicity in upgrading or even migrating data to a completely new cluster, it will be worth the time getting your Elastic Stack up to date and ready for features to come.

In case you need help, don’t hesitate to contact us and we will guide you through the process.

Written by: Joar Svensson, Consultant Findwise

Under the hood of the search engine

While using a search application we rarely think about what happens inside it. We just type a query, sometime refine details with facets or additional filters and pick one of the returned results. Ideally, the most desired result is on the top of the list. The secret of returning appropriate results and figuring out which fits a query better than others is hidden in the scoring, ranking and similarity functions enclosed in relevancy models. These concepts are crucial for the search application user’s satisfaction.

In this post we will review basic components of the popular TF/IDF model with simple examples. Additionally, we will learn how to ask Elasticsearch for explanation of scoring for a specific document and query.

Document ranking is one of the fundamental problems in information retrieval, a discipline acting as a mathematical foundation of search. The ranking, which is literally assigning a rank to a document matching search query corresponds with a term of relevance. Document relevance is a function which determines how well given document meets the search query. A concept of similarity corresponds, in turn, to the relevance idea, since relevance is a metric of similarity between a candidate result document and a search query. Continue reading